My Journey as a Fair Trader

‘Why you do what you do’ Series The world is full of great people you can learn from and be inspired by. Read their stories about why they do what they do to make this world a better place.   Di Stitt Founder of One Colour and Australian and New Zealand distributor for Kenana Knitters via Kenana Down Under Photo Source: One Colour – Di Stitt with Milka   “I didn’t set out for Africa. The place kinda picks you. Back in the early 2000s, I became increasingly concerned over extreme poverty that I believed could be tackled through trade, not just aid. The statistics in 2005 were horrific; 1.4 billion trapped in extreme poverty. As my boys were going to school, I found myself with more time, and it dawned on me not to waste what time we have. We enjoyed a great and healthy lifestyle. We were educated. We need so little effort to make life easy. I found out about fair trade through some key individuals. It fitted my beliefs of ‘trade, not aid’. I have a friend who buys from the Oxfam catalogue. She showed me what buying from people who made the products was like, and I found this to be a fascinating concept. Then there was a couple running Tribes and Nation, Grant and Mignonne, whom I met at a conference. They’d returned from living in Tanzania, and were big advocates for fair trade. The encounter gave me more ‘Aha’ moments, with stories of unconceivable poverty due to unfair trade. I decided there and then that if I wanted to make a difference,... read more

Clowning for a good cause

‘Why you do what you do’ series The world is full of great people you can learn from and be inspired by. Read their stories about why they do what they do to make this world a better place.   Tim Webster (Timbadin the Clown) Founder of Humanitarian Clowns Photo Source: Humanitarian Clowns – Tim and his Mum, Marguerite   “I was 2 when I was diagnosed with leukemia. Mum was only 21, with a week-old newborn, when she got the news. A single mum after leaving a domestic violence home, our only support was family. It was not until Mum found Challenge Cancer, a community support network for kids with cancer. That gave Mum a bit of a break and gave me the opportunity to be a normal kid going along to camps. I experienced what community support can do. And that gave me the drive to do the same. When I was older, I travelled around the world doing community development. Clowning was something I did for fun. In Uganda, I was checking out a small town called Jinja situated along the Nile river when I spotted four kids playing cards. It was like seeing a photo out of a World Vision magazine. I walked up to them and asked them whether they wanted to see a magic trick. They said ‘Yes’. After I finished with the trick, I asked them whether they wanted to see more and they said ‘Yes!’. So I ran back to the hotel, got my magic gear and when I got back, I was greeted by 150 kids and adults from the village,... read more